Author Archives: Tom Lehmann

Dough storage can make or break your operation

2009 October: Dough Doctor

Dough storage –– this is one of those topics that I continually get questions about, so it’s probably time that we go back and revisit the basics. The way in which we store our dough has changed over the years. Back in the 1950s it was common to allow the mixed dough to remain inMore »

2009 November: Dough Doctor

2009 November: Dough Doctor

Oil is a truly multi-functional ingredient in pizza dough production. It can affect everything from the crispiness to flavor of the crust, as well as the way the dough handles during shaping. The type of oil used can influence the flavor of the finished crust, providing anything from a neutral flavor to characterizing flavor. ForMore »

Dough Doctor: How does gluten affect dough?

2009 August: Dough Doctor

Gluten is the one thing that holds our dough together. Without it, the dough would be a pasty mix of ingredients, lacking the capability of being shaped, hand-tossed or slapped. Contrary to what a bag of fl our might say, flour does not contain any gluten. Instead, it contains specific wheat proteins which, when agitatedMore »

2009 June: Dough Doctor

2009 June: Dough Doctor

Take-and-bake pizza is growing in popularity, and I constantly get questions on how to make it without preparing special dough. At one time or another, you may have been asked to prepare a par-baked pizza for a customer. What you actually did was make an early version of a take-and-bake pizza. Years ago, we usedMore »

The Dough Doctor talks calzones

2009 July: Dough Doctor

From time to time I get requests from readers asking for a dough formula suitable for making calzones. The truth of the matter is that while you can use a specific dough formula for making calzones, your regular pizza dough will work just fine in this application. Let’s start by looking at a dedicated calzoneMore »

2009 May: Dough Doctor

2009 May: Dough Doctor

I hold a special place in my heart for bubbles and blisters on pizza crusts — because this was the first problem I ever worked on. To prevent them, what you need to concentrate on are dough temperature and fermentation time. In studies that we have conducted, we found that fresh dough exhibited the mostMore »

2009 April: Dough Doctor

2009 April: Dough Doctor

For some of us, achieving a crispy crust pizza is like chasing down that legendary Golden Fleece, but it really doesn’t have to be such a massive undertaking. Below are some tips to get you on your way: Tip No. 1: The protein content of the flour can influence the potential crispiness of the finishedMore »

2009 March: Dough Doctor

2009 March: Dough Doctor

Like other types of yeast leavened bread doughs, pizza doughs will benefit from fermenting for a period of time before using or baking. Fermentation provides dough conditioning, making the dough easier to shape. It also reduces the propensity of the dough to bubble during baking, and it does wonders for the flavor of the dough,More »

2009 February: Dough Doctor

2009 February: Dough Doctor

Some pizza doughs are made with sugar, and others are made without. Typically, we fi nd that dough destined to be baked at high temperatures is made without any added sugar, while those that will be baked at lower temperatures (425 to 450 F) will contain at least some sugar to assist in crust colorMore »