Tiramisu & Chocolate Martini

Mascarpone (mahs-kar-POH-neh) is not actually a cheese (no starter or rennet is used to produce it), but it is always included in the cheese family when the subject of relatives come up. And in the Italian arsenal of cheeses it stands tall. A rich and lush cow’s milk cheese, mascarpone is double or triple cream,More »

Oven Dried Tomatoes

For added authenticity, consider trying tomatoes on your own (provided you have the manpower). It’s easier than you might think. Here’s a quick recipe: Oven-Dried Tomatoes 2 pounds Roma tomatoes 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus additional as needed 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves 5 garlic cloves, crushed 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoonMore »

Fontina Asiago

Fontina and Asiago are two important Italian cheeses, and both are fortunate enough to carry a dual citizenship. Born in Italy –– fontina in the Piedmont, Asiago in the Veneto –– they have been successfully replicated in the United States by skillful cheesemakers in Calfornia and Wisconsin. In Italy, fontina and Asiago are made usingMore »

Incorporate Antipasta Across the Menu

Don’t limit the antipasto concept to platters. Consider the suggestions below to stretch antipasto across the menu: • Create an antipasto salad where assorted meats, cheese and vegetables sit over mixed greens. • Offer antipasto-style subs, paninis, wraps or sandwiches built around standard platter ingredients such as salami, pepperoni and cheese or roasted artichoke hearts,More »

Bruschetta Crostini

Bruschetta and Crostini are essentially in the same family of Italian appetizers, yet each has its own distinct personality. Add one or the other to your antipasti menu (if you add both it might confuse your customer). Generally speaking, if you are more into Italian fine dining, crostini would be more appropriate. For Italian casualMore »